Schrödinger’s Restaurant

Squeezed five tight onto a Córdoba leatherette
Banquet, the one who never says “always:”
Memory’s lost in the pantry. Yet when you sell a story,
Instead of that pinstripe suit
There’s a T-shirt forever holding up a
Thumb print pointed right “I’m with stupid.”
Simultaneously towards me and you
Never together and always on top.

A broken, static nonelectromagnetic
Compass of neurotic eye brightening
Mouth watering bites.
Share my fish of the everyday special.
It’s a big enough red herring to eat now and never.
The free beverages flow but forever
Into a pool of ice a melted puffin pastry.
Tricky things, so inviting
Yet so biting you hear them thinking
“So this hairless jailor wears a suit
But no tuxedoes found uptown.”
Your rainbow nose bird
Smoked her way across town
Marlene Dietrich of the Bronx zoo.

Slippery slopes on open toast slathered
By some noxious fruits and fragrant curds.

Congratulations, you’ve made yourself breakfast today.
Let us eat then, you and I
Let us wilt upon the sky a leave of grass
Green before the tornadoes. But just suppose this time
You wear something resembling clothes.
It’s absolutely forbidden to bring a lab coat and
An appetite whetted on spittle griddle cakes.
Fashionably stressed
Your breakfasts served in bed
Where eating by fading light of winter days
Laughing at you for getting up at lunchtime,
Breakfast mistaken for the wrong meal.
Blonde diner car broad
She’s such a dish penning an order and turning on a heel,
Suddenly slipping on a banana peel.
How slapstick made you laugh.

Let’s call it a short semantic service for the guilty
Pleasures of brunch. Eat of gratitude instead
Since sincerity is beyond my gastronomic experience.
A trifle falls apart in a box
The berries tumble like Jill and Jill
From a hill of yellow sponge.

You won’t find me
But you can always see me
I’m spinning plates at
Schrödinger’s Restaurant
Where food arrives and then doesn’t.
Cats black run out the front gate
Arriving white at the back swinging gates.

Finish eating peacefully, with love your wife and not wife.
Her note scratched on the back of a non payable check:
Make sure to do the mopping up of everything on your plate,
With white toast, or with nothing but your tongue.
No ones looking at you anymore
Anachronisms come built with a kill switch.
Schrödinger typed the menu in mimeograph blue
And we lift our morning quiz up to light our eyes
With the power of copies, copies, copies,
Enough copies.

It’s Complicated

Leave me alone, please
and stop annoying me.
Of course I love you.
I don’t blame you
for everything.
You are pissing me
off now. Do not
make me say
something I will
regret.
Of course I want
to go to your
oncology appointment.
You never told me
what time we had to go.
You only put the
schedule on the fridge
last week.
I do accept your
calendar invitations.
Quit pressuring me
or we will definitely
not have sex.
That wasn’t a
threat.
I don’t hate you.
Why do you piss
me off by saying
such stupid things.
No, I do not contradict
everything you say.
Yes I took my med.
No I am not hungry.
I don’t sleep all
of the time.
No I did not sleep well.
Why did you let me
sleep the day away.
We do go out.
I can remember
when.
You’re crazy.
Can’t you just leave
me alone
already.

Sure. I can leave
You alone.
Conversations
never change
in a dark room
full of too many
decisions
and no answers.
I walk away
again and
make breakfast
at 3:00 pm.

Without warmth
there’s no fire.

Op-Ed: Regarding Cancer and Making Personal Connections

My dear friends,

I’ve received so many amazing letters from people who read my blog or found me through another online channel like my Etsy shop, YeuxDeux Vintage, or on Instagram or Twitter or Facebook. They read about my diagnosis and my current life and find common ground, and I’m honored to communicate with people who were touched enough by my life to personally reach out. I appreciate their candor and I am especially humbled by the emotional outpourings of some of the communications I receive. Unnecessarily, their email begins with an apology for a “stranger” so openly sharing their experiences with me. But are we really strangers?

It’s impossible for me to conceptualize the idea of a stranger. If you believe as I do that we are all made of the same “stuff” the universe is borne from, then we are all part of a single infinite family. I’m very much Jungian in my spiritual beliefs. On the other hand, my father, who studied Freudian psychoanalysis and was an atheist, never appreciated much about my spiritualistic tendencies. Jung’s theory of synchronicity certainly supports my belief that we meet people when the right time and space collide, however our acquaintance comes to fruition be it virtual or face to face.

I’ve learned that the people I meet virtually share my own philosophies and align with my experiences far more frequently than a smaller circle of people in my immediate geography. Makes sense mathematically – there’s nearly 8 billion of us globally and only a few hundred thousand around me. I have also decided to lay bare my personal life on my blog. As a part of the confessional nature of my writing, my pain and my emotional turmoil make my the most private inner world available to those who were heretofore unknown. Some with cancer, breast or metastatic or other forms, some care givers to those with diseases of the mind and the body, some creative writers, and some lives carry emotional similarities to mine.

Anyone who decides to engage with me receives a very dear gift in my response. My words are wrapped with care and a certain kind of love that’s unheard of where I currently reside. Still, I find isolation in my life with cancer.

For instance, last week I could not stop thinking about my mortality. How could I find a way not to ruminate as my three year diagnosis anniversary in my rear view mirror and oncology appointments and chemo and other therapies in the windshield looking at the unknown duration of my life on the road ahead of me. I snapped at my husband for his glaring lack of celebrating life’s time markers with me. He instead ignores them as a way of ignoring what I’m coping with primarily alone. In fact there is no more time left to avoid celebrating cancerversaries, birthdays, and anniversaries. He’s very good at disguising his sadness with annoyance, using my disease, my side effects, and and my cash flow as excuses. Such bullshit.

We are both aware of his avoidance. He has yet he to open his heart, to enable his true empathy, or allow my state of being to enter his consciousness… without relying on such lame excuses. I too wonder if the overwhelming amount of crap piled up between us is surmountable, and the task ahead staggers my mind. I wonder if we can ever find new footing on which we can look through the same windshield from the same vehicle to make this trip together. Yet he cannot completely get his mind to wrap around a tremendous daily uncertainty. It’s all too much for someone who thrives on order.

This may provide some insight as to why I’m happy to find the better part of my human condition and to find connectedness where and when it presents itself. I find peace with all that life’s delivered on my doorstep, whether or not I order it from the infinite universal catalogue of “Oh My God.” There’s so much complexity to a life, irrespective of whether one finds themselves with a cancer diagnosis. By the time we reach 50 the explosion of our entire life’s plan is the last thing we expect.

My plans got blown to bits but heart remains solid. So, keep those cards and letters coming my friends, keep them coming.

With love,
Ilene
Head Driver
The CancerBus

P.S. Sorry it’s been a while since my last post. My minds been occupied with heavy things and I’ve tried to pay better attention to my relationship to insure it’s survival. As my friends, I’m sure you understand.

Canferatu: The Prequel

In which our heroine finds herself clutched in the monster’s filthy, razor sharp claws, afraid for her life.

Introduction: The scripting process begins and ends

This narrative slowly opens and possibly took several years for the writer to realize the finished script. Editing the story of a life continues beyond publication, past the timeline of those who inspired the characters themselves. Those millions of words, her own and the voices of many others, became nothing more than ash made by trash bin fire. The wire mesh bin sat next to a solid oak beast of a work surface, the top ringed by years of too-hot coffee cups, and covered in a tablecloth of loose papers. A cracked black leather swivel chair sat empty and pushed back and turned away from the monstrous kneehole desk. On top of all the remnants of the writer squats an old black Corona typewriter, its clacks and clangs silent, it and the room gathering dust with every day since it’s author began her lifetime leave of absence.

Three years ago she abandoned a life of of golden accolades and long, meandering plans for future gambols. Three years ago, she traded the promise of generally uplifting experiences for the protracted life of a victim, incarcerated in her own body for crimes no one could pin down to a single suspect. Lately she looked weighted down by absurdly heavy fatigue. Additionally, without any real past precedent, she began to catch many uncommon colds and any new flu of the present season. Never before had her immunity left her body so unsecured and without patrol. It seemed illness had cracked her genetic health code. Our author’s body felt like someone else’s, although outwardly it looked exactly like hers, other than bluish circles around her eyes. As her story unfolded, she assumed these symptoms had to be a sign of work burnout and too much step-parenting stress.

Cortisol, a result of stress, certainly played a key role, aiding and abetting the ghoul who committed the ultimate crime against her, in an inside job right under her skin. Regretfully, she paid minimal attention to the diseased monster on a million-year long crime spree, taking women and even some men to an early grave, but not after draining them of their life force and absorbing it into his own body, which made him stronger with each new victim. And the shape-shifting monster metamorphosed to outsmart even the savviest of detectives who aimed to catch this predator once and for all. With each new case, the authorities found some new twist or turn to throw them off of his scent. He reeked of death.

A malcontented criminal, he tortured her unmercifully then leaving her alone, broke, and without empathy from anyone. This vampiric disease sucks the life out of its victims, some slowly, and some very quickly, but all losing their lives to the waking nightmare itself. In her case, she wrote the screenplay, acted the starring role, and eventually scrapped her success for a slow decline towards failure at the fangs of Canferatu, or the Vampire.

Part II. Oh, no! (Everything changed overnight )

One March night, I curled into the fetal position in the middle of our bed, sweating and wailing. I suffered from extremely severe abdominal cramps from what we thought was a case of bad food poisoning. My husband, Craig, finally demanded I get into the car and go to the hospital. He physically put my body over his shoulder and got me into the cloud like front seat of his Jaguar and pulled the seat belt around me. This, only after his heart sank as he watched helpless. Inconsolable and with huge tears bursting from my eyes, I screamed at him, “there is no way I’m going to the hospital! I’ve never been to the hospital! I’ve only been once in my life, when I was born and I’m not going!”

On the other side of the looking glass, this Alice awoke the very next day in a bizarre alternative universe. “You have metastatic stage IV breast cancer and ascites fluid build up in your abdomen.” Everyone around me looked stunned. Everyone who called to check up on me went silent, leaving me holding my cell phone and repeating, “hello?” checking to see if their calls had dropped.

“Not her! She’s fine. She takes care of herself. Look at her – she’s going to be 50 in June, she doesn’t look anything like 50, let alone like someone with a doomsday prognosis.” Sword of Damocles hung on the mint green wall over the hospital bed, my morphine drip morphing everyone’s words, a swirl of doctors, test results, and of two hospitals fighting over whose patient’s money the other stole by keeping me in their bed. I felt like a mixed metaphor in the wrong storybook. Now Goldilocks? Clearly I wasn’t in a fairy tale and Goldilocks would certainly find every hospital bed uncomfortable.

The bleak prognosis of my diagnosis shocked me and everyone involved in my life. Inescapable, unbelievable, incurable…a normal life as I once knew it (whatever normal means who can say) abruptly ended as exhaustion, pain, sadness and finally a wholly reinvented life took over completely. What could anyone say after five days hospitalization, five liters of cancerous fluid removed, five days of struggle to work with insurers, five more to become a patient of an oncology team, and five weeks from the day of my initial hospitalization I began my chemo and hormone treatments. Yet all my doctors could say was…wow.

Everything changed, including my relationships with my family, my friends, my stepsons, and Craig. My husband fell into the depths of an anxiety fueled depression. I’m happy to report three years later, he’s finally recovered, sort of – unless some dramatic bullshit flung from the other side of town where his brainwashing banshee of an ex wife pretends to raise his younger son. Do not judge. I’ve kept this ugly saga away from my writing generally speaking. This discussion requires a blog site all its own, and that would only serve to elevate an already overinflated sense of control for a person with a massive narcissistic disorder. No thanks. Dealing with the emotional wreckage and fallout is quite enough. (In case you’re reading this, and you know who you are, go fuck yourself.)

Craig’s recovery requires a medication called Pristiq. His mental health issues began well before my diagnosis. After the stage four gauntlet got laid down, he struggled with the horrible notion of my death and we began about five months in hell to get back to one another. He initially reacted by ignoring me and admitted feeling resentment, of which he felt ashamed. In hindsight I am uncertain as to how ashamed he really felt. It’s clearer to me how much resentment lingers in the air between us, even now, three years later. It’s as though he tests me. He waits to tell me I never want to do anything and asks me to go out with him when I’m having a bad Health day or when I’m enraptured in writing or editing a piece of poetry or an essay for my blog, or trying to work on my Etsy business. All of these things suffer from the resulting bickering brought on by the care giver role thrust upon him. The role he threw off like a bad suit after a long day almost immediately after learning of the responsibilities.

Lonely, scared, angry, tired, moody, but generally motivated to live, I said, “not me, no way.” And sure as I tell anyone who’s reading this, I’m still here three years after my diagnosis of stage IV A1 lobular hormone receptor positive breast cancer with metastasis to the bones (and now liver). My sexuality and womanhood now stripped away from me, I no longer appeal to my husband or anyone for that matter. I feel like I’m a non-gendered adult. I’ve taken a laundry list of medications, sat in monthly seats in the infusion center for shots to my abdomen and gleuts, monthly blood work, countless visits to oncologists, psychologists, palliative oncology, radiology, specialists, a multitude of nurses, a surgeon. I spent a second week-long in the hospital. I’ve been to breast and metastatic support groups, cancer retreats, and learned to deeply meditate.

There’s good things that I’m certain have humbled me. Yet I speak to none of my former friends but a couple. My new friends don’t expect me to be as I was and know me only as I am now – someone with metastatic cancer. I never see my stepsons who have been convinced by their mother that I’m lying about the severity of my disease because I look too good and I’m simply a gold digger who doesn’t want to work full time anymore. I wish, honey, I wish.

It’s still a nightmare and admittedly and despite the “best of the worst case scenarios,” I’m not thrilled with a life path that leads only to an early demise. Canferatu never sleeps, his fangs deep within my neck. And though you cannot see him, he preys on my organs and functional systems until another cocktail puts him into a coma, but a coma he always awakens from to claw at my insides and take more of my energy for himself.

I still want my life back.