Comprehensive List of Cancer and coronavirus resources | UICC

Cancer and coronavirus resources | UICC
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How to Move with Metastatic Cancer (hint: HELP!)

How do you handle huge life events with metastatic cancer? As best as you can and with slow determination. Asking for assistance from your friends and from your family sometimes doesn’t pan out. I have a wonderful friend I made years ago at a garage sale. She was a couple of dollars short and I’d covered her so she could enjoy a few vintage ceramics and beads.

Now, six years later Des is my friend and Des is my housekeeper. Through the course of time we’d found commonality in our eclectic eye for beads and for jewelry making. We drudged through the stress of packing, readying this memory box of 1600 square feet to move its contents elsewhere. We actually live in a pretty nice townhouse. If you’d like to check out my amateur “staging” here’s the link to the sales materials including a 3-D rendering and a video. http://www.1481carrington.com/

Removing the traces of 11 years of memories as eclectic and varied as the beads I collect brings about a sort of melancholy to my heart. Des came over to help me pack as we sell our townhouse. She also refuses to take a dime because what once were services have shifted into the kindness of a friendship. She commented that I’d give the shirt off my back, which I literally have done several times in my life. She said she couldn’t possibly take money from me when clearly I was the one who needed help right now.

My husband made sure she got paid for it, since she cannot afford the time and I cannot afford the intense guilt. I’ve never needed so much physical assistance before. I guess I’ll chalk it up to age and leave the cancer for another time. But I can’t, because it’s for the cancer we are moving and due to the cancer that I need help.

All the kindness I have shown her was reflected back at me in ways I never imagined. When we give it should never hold the expectation that we may receive something in return. But as my philosophy about karma is not to do bad in the world as it keeps you looking over your shoulder at whose anger is behind you. Then you cannot see the good that’s right in front of you and you either miss these opportunities or trip over them and fall on your face.

A change of residence is very high on the stress scale https://www.stress.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/stress-inventory-1.pd

My stress adds up to just under having a 50% chance over the next two years of having a catastrophic health event. I think I’m already there so I’ve beaten the stress scale by four and a half years. But looking back I had a very low level of stress in my life in the years leading up to my diagnosis, so go figure. Perhaps the subconscious predicts stressors before they arrive to eat us alive. I was planning a change of career and the very day – March 15, 2015 – was the same day I was diagnosed in the hospital and the day I was supposed to start a new job.

You Oughta Be in Pictures!

The house really shows well – I’ll have it even more staged for our open house on Sunday. There is so much work to do after living a full life for 11 years in a home. And our home has been really good to us. I’m grateful to it for giving us positive memories, but it’s time to close this chapter in our lives and move onto the next chapter .

I know intrinsically that this house will be wonderful to whomever buys her next. It’s stable and so well cared for and we feel bittersweet selling her but we leave it with good love and positive energy. After searching for our new digs, I believe you can tell if people who lived in a house were happy and if it looks like a product of divorce or ugliness. Not so here!

The Zombie Apocalypse

In the state of California, if someone died in a house in the three years prior to selling it you must disclose that event to the buyers? I found it morbid and kind of strange. our culture’s obsession with first person shooter games, zombies, and horror films directly opposes the feelings of disgust when faced with real death or the dying. I’d think people would be desensitized to death rather than creeped out by it.

It’s a huge decision to invest into a house. Love, time, energy, money and holiday spirit, all paint it the colors of the personalities who reside inside. Our next home will likely be my last move, my last address, the last place my name will be printed on mail and arrive in my mailbox. Maybe the quote about dying twice – once when your physical body dies and the last time someone says your name aloud – should be corrected to dying three times if we include the last time your name is printed on junk mail. I bet junk mail lists last a lot longer than even the youngest people who might speak of me later given the tenacity of mass marketers.

Oh, and I’ll submit this: if the last time you posthumously receive a piece of junk mail addressed to you is the last whisper of your name what does that say about our culture when we cannot even control having our online avatars removed from Facebook and Twitter. If that’s all true, then we’re all going to live forever. A planet of the walking dead carrying sacks of marketing materials for the Red Cross and coupons for barbecue. The zombie apocalypse is upon us.

Canferatu: The Prequel

In which our heroine finds herself clutched in the monster’s filthy, razor sharp claws, afraid for her life.

Introduction: The scripting process begins and ends

This narrative slowly opens and possibly took several years for the writer to realize the finished script. Editing the story of a life continues beyond publication, past the timeline of those who inspired the characters themselves. Those millions of words, her own and the voices of many others, became nothing more than ash made by trash bin fire. The wire mesh bin sat next to a solid oak beast of a work surface, the top ringed by years of too-hot coffee cups, and covered in a tablecloth of loose papers. A cracked black leather swivel chair sat empty and pushed back and turned away from the monstrous kneehole desk. On top of all the remnants of the writer squats an old black Corona typewriter, its clacks and clangs silent, it and the room gathering dust with every day since it’s author began her lifetime leave of absence.

Three years ago she abandoned a life of of golden accolades and long, meandering plans for future gambols. Three years ago, she traded the promise of generally uplifting experiences for the protracted life of a victim, incarcerated in her own body for crimes no one could pin down to a single suspect. Lately she looked weighted down by absurdly heavy fatigue. Additionally, without any real past precedent, she began to catch many uncommon colds and any new flu of the present season. Never before had her immunity left her body so unsecured and without patrol. It seemed illness had cracked her genetic health code. Our author’s body felt like someone else’s, although outwardly it looked exactly like hers, other than bluish circles around her eyes. As her story unfolded, she assumed these symptoms had to be a sign of work burnout and too much step-parenting stress.

Cortisol, a result of stress, certainly played a key role, aiding and abetting the ghoul who committed the ultimate crime against her, in an inside job right under her skin. Regretfully, she paid minimal attention to the diseased monster on a million-year long crime spree, taking women and even some men to an early grave, but not after draining them of their life force and absorbing it into his own body, which made him stronger with each new victim. And the shape-shifting monster metamorphosed to outsmart even the savviest of detectives who aimed to catch this predator once and for all. With each new case, the authorities found some new twist or turn to throw them off of his scent. He reeked of death.

A malcontented criminal, he tortured her unmercifully then leaving her alone, broke, and without empathy from anyone. This vampiric disease sucks the life out of its victims, some slowly, and some very quickly, but all losing their lives to the waking nightmare itself. In her case, she wrote the screenplay, acted the starring role, and eventually scrapped her success for a slow decline towards failure at the fangs of Canferatu, or the Vampire.

Part II. Oh, no! (Everything changed overnight )

One March night, I curled into the fetal position in the middle of our bed, sweating and wailing. I suffered from extremely severe abdominal cramps from what we thought was a case of bad food poisoning. My husband, Craig, finally demanded I get into the car and go to the hospital. He physically put my body over his shoulder and got me into the cloud like front seat of his Jaguar and pulled the seat belt around me. This, only after his heart sank as he watched helpless. Inconsolable and with huge tears bursting from my eyes, I screamed at him, “there is no way I’m going to the hospital! I’ve never been to the hospital! I’ve only been once in my life, when I was born and I’m not going!”

On the other side of the looking glass, this Alice awoke the very next day in a bizarre alternative universe. “You have metastatic stage IV breast cancer and ascites fluid build up in your abdomen.” Everyone around me looked stunned. Everyone who called to check up on me went silent, leaving me holding my cell phone and repeating, “hello?” checking to see if their calls had dropped.

“Not her! She’s fine. She takes care of herself. Look at her – she’s going to be 50 in June, she doesn’t look anything like 50, let alone like someone with a doomsday prognosis.” Sword of Damocles hung on the mint green wall over the hospital bed, my morphine drip morphing everyone’s words, a swirl of doctors, test results, and of two hospitals fighting over whose patient’s money the other stole by keeping me in their bed. I felt like a mixed metaphor in the wrong storybook. Now Goldilocks? Clearly I wasn’t in a fairy tale and Goldilocks would certainly find every hospital bed uncomfortable.

The bleak prognosis of my diagnosis shocked me and everyone involved in my life. Inescapable, unbelievable, incurable…a normal life as I once knew it (whatever normal means who can say) abruptly ended as exhaustion, pain, sadness and finally a wholly reinvented life took over completely. What could anyone say after five days hospitalization, five liters of cancerous fluid removed, five days of struggle to work with insurers, five more to become a patient of an oncology team, and five weeks from the day of my initial hospitalization I began my chemo and hormone treatments. Yet all my doctors could say was…wow.

Everything changed, including my relationships with my family, my friends, my stepsons, and Craig. My husband fell into the depths of an anxiety fueled depression. I’m happy to report three years later, he’s finally recovered, sort of – unless some dramatic bullshit flung from the other side of town where his brainwashing banshee of an ex wife pretends to raise his younger son. Do not judge. I’ve kept this ugly saga away from my writing generally speaking. This discussion requires a blog site all its own, and that would only serve to elevate an already overinflated sense of control for a person with a massive narcissistic disorder. No thanks. Dealing with the emotional wreckage and fallout is quite enough. (In case you’re reading this, and you know who you are, go fuck yourself.)

Craig’s recovery requires a medication called Pristiq. His mental health issues began well before my diagnosis. After the stage four gauntlet got laid down, he struggled with the horrible notion of my death and we began about five months in hell to get back to one another. He initially reacted by ignoring me and admitted feeling resentment, of which he felt ashamed. In hindsight I am uncertain as to how ashamed he really felt. It’s clearer to me how much resentment lingers in the air between us, even now, three years later. It’s as though he tests me. He waits to tell me I never want to do anything and asks me to go out with him when I’m having a bad Health day or when I’m enraptured in writing or editing a piece of poetry or an essay for my blog, or trying to work on my Etsy business. All of these things suffer from the resulting bickering brought on by the care giver role thrust upon him. The role he threw off like a bad suit after a long day almost immediately after learning of the responsibilities.

Lonely, scared, angry, tired, moody, but generally motivated to live, I said, “not me, no way.” And sure as I tell anyone who’s reading this, I’m still here three years after my diagnosis of stage IV A1 lobular hormone receptor positive breast cancer with metastasis to the bones (and now liver). My sexuality and womanhood now stripped away from me, I no longer appeal to my husband or anyone for that matter. I feel like I’m a non-gendered adult. I’ve taken a laundry list of medications, sat in monthly seats in the infusion center for shots to my abdomen and gleuts, monthly blood work, countless visits to oncologists, psychologists, palliative oncology, radiology, specialists, a multitude of nurses, a surgeon. I spent a second week-long in the hospital. I’ve been to breast and metastatic support groups, cancer retreats, and learned to deeply meditate.

There’s good things that I’m certain have humbled me. Yet I speak to none of my former friends but a couple. My new friends don’t expect me to be as I was and know me only as I am now – someone with metastatic cancer. I never see my stepsons who have been convinced by their mother that I’m lying about the severity of my disease because I look too good and I’m simply a gold digger who doesn’t want to work full time anymore. I wish, honey, I wish.

It’s still a nightmare and admittedly and despite the “best of the worst case scenarios,” I’m not thrilled with a life path that leads only to an early demise. Canferatu never sleeps, his fangs deep within my neck. And though you cannot see him, he preys on my organs and functional systems until another cocktail puts him into a coma, but a coma he always awakens from to claw at my insides and take more of my energy for himself.

I still want my life back.