Breast Cancer Action Think Before You Pink Toolkit

As I look at the many messages portrayed about breast cancer, one might get the wrong impression. The impression that early detection prevents secondary breast cancer. The impression that if one dies from breast cancer they must have done something wrong or or have not done something right. It’s a message that pink is the color of health – the color of support, the color of good women who survived doing all the best treatments. The color of white women. The color of disease free women. The color of great corporate citizenship. I’m certain that there’s individuals whose hearts in the right place, but the companies for which they work interests lie in only one thing: shareholder value, read profits.

Profiteering on the backs of the suffering makes me wince. I’ve been a CEO. I know the impact of impressions in the public eye and their bearing on profits. This primer provides you with the necessary information to help educate and actionable things you can do to help uncover the myths surrounding metastatic breast cancer. We don’t ever stop treatments, the treatments fail us and we don’t survive, we die. We are not counted until then, and the number of us is a mere estimate that hovered around 160-170,000 every year with 40,000 new cases and we die every day.

The disbelief in our illness because we look too good to be so sick creates another paradox. I was told this evening I could work and plenty of people with cancer work. Yet if a job were available in Silicon Valley for a woman over 50 with metastatic cancer that would make her an employee who needs more than 50 sick days a year and late arrivals and early departures in a cut throat traffic heavy ugly, stress inducing environment I’d like to imagine that it would be easy and if it were I’d be able to make enough money to both survive and to pay the massive health bills and massive loss of wages for going to an office with flickering lights, noise, electromagnetism, and so on? You might think it was this very environment that accelerated my disease in the first place.

Call me a pessimist or a cynic, but 28 years of professional experience got me nowhere once I reached 47. Many women struggle with finding work that pays what they’re worth. I feel like pink washing is sort of like that. The token woman here or there who is able to hang on that long and then a company can take its due credit from her actively working for them for less than she’s worth. In this case, it’s her life. My life.

So click the link and download the documents available to you. They’re worth reading and may just move you to act on your indignation.

bcaction.org/site-content/uploads/2010/11/2012-Think-Before-You-Pink-Toolkit.pdf

And, cancer really, really sucks. I’m clearly not feeling hopeful today. But there’s always tomorrow…or not.