Where’s Your Mind at Night: A dive into cancer and insomnia

Terminal illness effects the mind in some not so obvious ways. If you’ve got cancer of any kind certainly you’ve done deep, soul searching, looking for your own priorities and answers to life’s big philosophical questions. Yet even if you’re not terminally ill, there must’ve been times when you thought about some deep stuff, right? I mean thinking is usually what keeps us from sleep. But for those who suffer from many illnesses and not just cancer- take fibromyalgia for instance – the discomfort from pain and aches keeps you from getting comfortable enough to rest your mind and body.

Then there’s a very big mystery of why beyond these two major reasons we with stage 4 incurable can have insomnia. Nights not spent thinking about anything in particular and not physically uncomfortable, but just laying there unable to sleep for no apparent reason. I’ve not seen any science to study this form of insomnia. I have a guess that we really want to not miss any opportunities to live while we’re alive. Does sleep really keep us from those precious hours we could be doing things we can’t do when when are dead? It’s important and restorative for our bodies to heal and our minds to write memories on the big gray hard drive.

Sleep is for the dead, or so I’ve heard it said. And then there’s the little issue of wanting to experience life well rested and in a clear state of mind. Go figure – another paradox.

I’ve spent countless hours in deep meditation. On big questionas about mortality, about the importance of “things” VS. “people”, about letting go of unimportant emotional baggage, and forgiveness of myself, others, the universe and whatever my conception of a spiritual entity is like. I’m not going into that one. It’s been wise to not bring the r-bomb onto the blog (religion is best left with the p-bomb -politics which DO KEEP ME UP most nights because our beloved democracy is coming to a quick end as is my life – with a very screwed up, monstrous, interminable metastatic thing in a house it does not belong inside killing the very body that keeps it alive – it dies with its host).

However, just the simple fact of knowing my disease will kill me someday, that death is not some vague notion of inevitability, my thoughts turn more to dying and what plans I can and cannot make. I assume us stage 4 terminal endurers have these thoughts more often than people who have stage 0 through 3 “curable” cancers. But you tell me in the comments section below since I can only assume what I do not know.

Here’s a list of some things I think about throughout the course of a night:

  1. Should or shouldn’t I purchase the larger, economy size of soap, shampoo and conditioner? Will I survive long enough to use it all especially having really short hair now?

  2. I wonder if should subscribe to magazines or continue buying them off the shelf.

  3. Is it worth it to buy a new bicycle?

  4. Does my will still make sense?

  5. Should I visit the place I want to be naturally buried under a new born redwood tree in the Santa Cruz mountains or will it make me too upset? Shall I just instruct Craig to do what I want rather than choosing the space in advance?

  6. Do I want to reconsider becoming a marble instead? There’s a company that will take your body, burn it without polluting the environment and mix it with glass to create a beautiful paperweight or set of marbles from your remains. Pretty neat. You can be carried in your widower’s jeans’ pockets along with his keys.

  7. If I’m a marble and Craig dies what would happen to marble me? Will I just wind up in some antique shop along with a bunch of other marbles?

  8. Pink Floyd or Led Zeppelin?

  9. Watching a movie or rereading a book seems heretical.

  10. Put the ice cream down or finish this here pint… Oops. Don’t ask for any it’s done.

  11. Did I choose the right adoptive parent and back up parent for my cat-son Simon?

  12. Can I haunt people after I am dead and if I can who should I haunt?

  13. Conversely I’d really want to visit people I love. There’s some serious practical jokes I’d love to play on my OCD husband.

  14. And I’d love to torture his ex wife who spent years trying to break us up and also tells my stepsons I don’t really have cancer I just want to sponge off their dad and I am a gold digger. I wish. I have some lessons she needs to learn in my opinion. And who better than someone she haunted while I was alive!

  15. I’d love to see a few more places and have some experiences yet to do. The northern lights is one. Going back to Paris and France generally and traveling all of the UK. Meeting the people I’ve only been able to interact with on my blog or social media in person to secure my friendships and make them whole. The UK trip will help a lot with that one. There’s a lot more but these stand out.

  16. Can I rent an RV and drive around the US and see my old friends one more time before I die. I don’t have the money and I don’t know if I’ll have the time. I wish they’d be able to come see me. But if I’m not worth their time and money…well should I make an effort? I’ve spent a lot of time filling and u packing a lot of emotional baggage on this one in particular.

  17. Should I get a walk in bathtub? Will that make me an official senior citizen?

  18. Do I continue to keep trying some new somewhat tangential hobbies to my current hobbies? Will I have the time to be good at anything else other than what I’m already good at? Like gardening and growing food for us – there’s a lot to learn and who’d tend fo it when I am dead?

Whats on your list of things that keep you up at night? Can you relate to my list and my thoughts with regards to why we don’t sleep beyond the two big ones – mental and physical pain?

I’m pretty upset with a few people, several companies especially AT&T, and excited about a few activities and people who will visit in the next few months. And nervous about my upcoming radiation treatments on my vertebrae.

That’s just today’s mind antics so on that notes I’m going to go ground myself on the soil outside then go take a nice long bath. Fuck all the chores today. And fuck you cancer.

Help – or, the musing of a magic mountain Wonder Woman

She’s not your usual human being. She’s a humane being. One single letter – e – at the end of a human changes everything. If there were more humanes, we humans would suffer less at the end.

That letter means everything. So, should you have any ideas of how to help or should you like some help, Raven’s cottage by the sea could be a place to deposit yourself or some help.

There’s an intensity to Raven’s life story. No half baked cakes, no give up, no matters of inconvenience. People of love come to our lives only once in a while. Their stories are so truly amazing they inspire by simply being. They’re not embarrassed by anything you could say, do, excrete, or eat. They’re accepting of differences and invite them into their own lives. Their kind lived on the fringes of our planet until recently. There wasn’t a place for them to ring in new seasons for us or to take the soul from the dying by the hand and help to bring them gently to the place no one of the living can possibly know.

I picture her standing on the shore of the River Styx waiting for the boat to peek out from the fog – no one for her to see as she above all understands what limits are – and her boundaries and boarders create room for us to trust her either the most important part of life – after birth – which is death.

Death isn’t discussed in my part of the world – but perhaps it would if more soul midwifery were performed and more discovered a way to find comfort without stress and guilt of leaving people to mourn so many of us can leave this pain body behind like an old cloak.

Here’s her post reaching out for some assistance. There’s a great bit of information on what she offers her clients at her free retreats to pamper people with cancer who are in or out of treatments. People who need to feel loved, touched, and like a human being. Far too often we forget, because of fear and guilt, they it’s okay to need. To need a quiet place to heal and to feel.

I think even if you don’t live anywhere near Wales, her stories alone are reason enough to visit her blog and share your thoughts. She found me on my blog – and I’m glad she did. If you can buy one of her cool gemstone pendants on Facebook every little bit gives her the resources to help one person at a time with the loving kindness that shines with every word she writes. Even if you just read I think getting a little something from her spirit is enough support to encourage her to keep on going.

Heroes are everywhere.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I need help. There I said it! I run a cottage retreat offer free breaks for cancer / end of life patients. Im a soul midwife end of life companion and advocate for anyone who needs me. No charge free. Therapies visits support all free. Im also a wedding and funeral celebrant this service is…
— Read on ravenwordsmith.wordpress.com/2019/11/07/help/

A Fair Question

Whether or not you’re one of two people with a cancer diagnosis or one of the 40% of that 50% whose deadly prognosis of a metastatic cancer came down like Maxwells Silver Hammer, please ask yourself one simple question. It’s fair for me to ask you to ponder this for five seconds or five decades, if youre an insightful type.

It’s also a circumstantial question with many dependencies such as family, whether or not you’re a parent, religiosity, cultural upbringing, current socioeconomic and financial positions, physical and mental health, risk aversion, spontaneous adventurer or ardent planner, shopoholic lover of material belongings, artist, creative type, traveler or homebody, number of dependents, caregiver, planning capability…well you get my point.Forget all that and give yourself a green field and ask yourself this: if you found out you had a terminal illness today and you had no real idea of when you might die but you’re going to die sooner than later given there’s currently no cure for your disease what would you change about your life as it exists today?

Would you change anything at all? Would you leave your spouse your family your children? Would you travel the world? Would you quit your job? Could you quit your job? Do you have enough money to just take off and leave to follow that lifelong dream? Do you have what’s known as a bucket list, or as I like to call it a kick the bucket list, that you’d like to check off? What would you do? For the most part I bet you won’t or cab’t change very much. “I like to change a lot,” you might think. But alas as in most situations not much can or will change. That’s because your life as it exists now is your life as it existed before you were given your prognosis of death.

A Bifurcated Mind

What metastatic cancer has taught me is that there are two worlds that exist: the one that you had before your diagnosis and the one that you had after your prognosis. Chances are you’ll have quite some time to think about this question, which may keep you up any number of nights a week. You might suffer from insomnia, wondering if you’re doing the right thing or if you’re doing the right thing by the people that you love. Perhaps you don’t think anyone loves you much at all. The fact is they probably do but maybe you have low self-esteem and you just don’t feel it. Perhaps you hate your job and you want to quit. This might be a good time to quit actually. Leaving my career, which I didn’t necessarily want to, turned out to be a rather good thing for me.

I found out that I had an artistic side and I followed it. I also followed my hunch that there was a lot of waste going on in the world and that for my own special purposes I would sell things that were not made from new materials because they’d be all antique or vintage. I feel pretty good about that. But not much else in my life changed.

Except everything.

So ask yourself this question what if anything if you were given a diagnosis of metastatic cancer and a prognosis that you would die in the next two months to two years to 20 years: what would you do differently with your life? I leave you with this question on the last day of the year. Perhaps you can write your New Year’s resolutions for 2020 with it. 2020 vision is considered a great form of hindsight isn’t it?

And yet have you thought about what you might do for the next two years or 20 years if you have them? I can tell you this much, I certainly don’t do any New Year’s resolutions anymore. In fact last year I wasn’t supposed to live past February but here I am so…

Ask yourself this question what would you change about your life today even if you weren’t given a prognosis of death in the shorter term than you thought you had. If you can change some things maybe you should ask yourself what those things should be? Then if you were given a prognosis such as I have, you wouldn’t have to ask yourself this question night after night day after day questioning the people around you looking at them as though maybe they were your enemy or maybe they were not. I’m not sure sometimes but I will say this I do have some things in my life that I wouldn’t give up for anything.

I might change small things, huge things, things that might make a difference for other people or things that might just make a difference for me. I guarantee it’s a combination of a whole bunch of things but you’ll have to think long and hard about it. Give the question justice because it’s your life.

So, you’ve been diagnosed with a terminal illness and you must ask yourself the following question: what would you do differently in your life or change about your life so if any given week might be your last you’d be happy with it or at the very least okay with that week?

“That’s not a fair question.”

My husband reacted with a sense of injustice, but I don’t agree in its fairness. Just as there’s no stupid questions…No, every day isn’t a great day…that much is true.

However, built upon the foundation of modern western culture insure to that, due to no fault of our own, all of us were born into a time of rampant materialism. Noting we buy delivers on its promise of satisfaction. There’s the cliché small print that spells out a guarantee of no satisfaction. What it does guarantee: you’ll never see any money back should anything go awry. A broken warranty means by simply using a product said guarantee is null and void. A manufacturer’s guarantee is akin to cancer in some ways.

By living in our bodies with the environment at a time of great threat to its own mere existence, we are swimming in chemicals and stress and we’ve not evolved to handle it nor should we.The point I’m trying to get across is that by merely living in a physical body we are very highly susceptible to illness and specifically cancer. The warranty on our physical body while living in the post industrial, sedentary, sugar infused world with melting ice caps and chemicals in our air, water, and food there’s no guarantee of any kind. Now, keeping that in mind, ask yourself what would you do differently if anything given your own personal special circumstances even if you’re not hiding “a cancer” if you were to be diagnosed with a terminal illness?

By the way, I deplore that phrase – the article in front of cancer removes it from our body’s boundaries giving it a life of its own of sorts.

Regardless of all this philosophical pondering just be happy. The year 2020 is my year of hindsight, to help me find the foresight, to live in this moment in a way that’s just right for me.

Stay Tuned…

You’ll find my answer to this question in: A Fair Question Part II.

My heart and my soul go into this blog and these words and to the people who read it I thank you and I hope you continue to do so. I hope you leave a few more comments in the next year. I love your feedback. I really like hearing from you so I can feel as though I am not writing a little vanity blog. It’s healthy to receive both criticism and accolades. Your interactions let me know writing on the cancer bus isn’t for nought. By the way I consider you my friends and my extended family so here’s a big hug.I mean, for fuck’s sake, if you read this you know some of the most personally intimate things about me. So I trust you’ll ask yourselves this question and put some time into answerinng it. I guarantee if you’re not metastaticly inclined, you’ll have a much better idea of what it’s like to have a death sentence. Most of us can’t do much but focus on remaining alive, keeping a few people around us who care, keeping our lights on and some gas in the car.

If we are lucky.

All my love,

Ilene