Why Doctors Are Rethinking Breast-Cancer Treatment

Time Magazine article on doing nothing VS. the massive over treatment when faced with any stage of breast cancer diagnosis. The article also points out how slow the medical community reacts to breast cancer in general. Very worthwhile read for any cancer not just breast cancer.

amp.timeinc.net/time/4057310/breast-cancer-overtreatment/

Ilene

Female. East coast transplant living in the Bay Area of California. Living with Stage IV breast cancer. Married to the coolest guy in the universe who occasionally suffers from serious depression. Love my stepsons, although I never thought I'd have that thankless job - ever! And my best friend Simon is also my cat. How I have survived with stage IV: treatments including chemo and surgery; palliative oncology; tenacity; a dark sense of humor; support groups; and my newly reinvented career as a vintage and antiques maven. Some days I miss the old me who led a well respected and well paid life as a business strategist in high tech. So much for that. I blog to simply share my experiences and my poetic approach with others who have cancer of any kind or with their care givers and those who love them. If one person at the very least finds a little commonality or a friend out in the ether tor a smile, a common nod about this experience, or even a link to assistance, then I have accomplished a small but extraordinarily meaningful goal. Go team.

4 thoughts on “Why Doctors Are Rethinking Breast-Cancer Treatment

  1. This is very interesting. It sounds like its important to find out what kind of cancer it is and to explore all the options. Several years ago, one of my co-workers was diagnosed with throat cancer. The radiation treatment caused serious permanent damage to his vocal chords and his ability to eat. His doctor told him that they are decreasing the amount of radiation people get now for the same condition.

    1. The treatment options for all cancers seem to change with the passing months lately. The chemo regimes and immunotherapy targeted at the bad cells not the good cells using our own immune systems – supercharged – are the in fashion cancer cutting edge at the moment. But who knows what’s going to work for one person may not work for another. I suppose that’s the tricky thing about cancer: it’s almost as smart as the research and development teams at pharmaceutical companies and teaching hospitals like Stanford, the place I go for oncology and adjuvant treatments. I’m due to see the onco-genetics team when I can actually get an appointment as well. I see five different health practitioners and they’re all fulfilling a very important function and they all talk to one another about my health. That’s a fairly good system and one that doesn’t allow much to get through the cracks. Hopefully, your co-worker sees their oncologist once a year to make sure that the cancer hasn’t recurred and to treat it quickly if it has – so keeping up with treatment options is still really important.

        1. Thank you and I hope you come back to read more. I enjoy engaging with you and it helps my education process to understand what is helpful to share with others.

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