Sloop John B. aka Let Me Go Home

So hoist up the John B’s sail
See how the main sail sets
Call for the Captain ashore
Let me go home, let me go home
I want to go home
Well I feel so broke up
I want to go home
Hoist up the John-b sail.
See how the main sail sets,

I groan as I depart outrunning the Smurf blue scrubs-clad wheelchair engineer who, I’m totally convinced, wants only to embarrass me with one last spin round the rotunda of Stanford’s gynormous older hospital (a new one is on the way, thankfully). Leaving behind me a dishearteningly BORING stay in Stanford’s F-wing. Wow, ever so apropos of the oncology floor, the F-uck it wing, the F-ucking cancer wing. Let me never ever go into a hospital again.

Dehumanized. Depersonalized. Muted. Turned into a brainless pajama bag of pain and shit. Exasperated, exhausted annoyed. Telling the same boring story of how I arrived, my trip through the ER, the amount of fluid siphoned out of my abdomen, whether or not I went poopy in the toilet, as well as my level of discomfort. All told to a supporting cast in this theater of the absurd. All except for my angel in uniform, Stacey, who actually sees me as human and spending more than one shift with me, even requesting to take my bed at assignment time. We talked about everything and nothing, perfumes, children, cancer, other nurses, hospital stories. Stacey stopped by when she wasn’t obligated to do so, and see how I was feeling, to let me know she’d ordered the Flower Bomb perfume I sprayed on her wrists a few days earlier to make sure she’d like it enough to plunk down hard earned cash for it. Like a friend might, she came by my room when she’d heard my ticket outta there had been stamped, to say goodbye. Stacey remained my friend in the hospital for six boring shifts and her big smile, bounty of hair and breasts, and her need to talk to someone who could just ask questions and listen to her.

Basically, and aside from Stacey, at any given time, one might become confused permanently by a troupe of medical professionals, including:

Two doctors, one of whom visited me for exactly three minutes and accidentally ran into me during one of four daily 30 minute cross hospital walks,
Seven distinct nurses
Three nurse practitioners
Two social workers
One psychologist
One spiritual leader of the Rabbinical kind

The same questions day in day out, night after sleepless night…your level of pain, 0-10, 10 being the highest. Where? Which pain? It’s all over and all different. I learned to pantomime and point to my pain, showing anyone who buys a ticket to my freak show behind the curtain. No one likes to stay overnight in a hospital let alone six fabulous nights at the Palo Alto Stanford Hospital Resort and Country Club. Where sleep comes only to those who sleep with the fish, there’s no relationship between yourself and a concept called privacy.

I’m not contagious, therefore my roommates become a series of Spanish speaking, translator required, entire family toting, new treatment guinea pigs under tight scrutiny from the nurses who all ignore me. I’m not part of the program. And but the way why the translators who clearly were trained in translation skills raise their voices with each translated word to the supposed Spanish only speaking individual in the next bed in the room, is beyond my comprehension. I hear both of the roommates, between whom I get one 36 hour reprieve from holding my farts due to close proximity of their family and our shared bathroom.

You want to define understatement? My visible excitement level peaking higher than my pain level for the first time in weeks as I jumped at the first chance to “give up” my bed and an opportunity manage my symptoms at home until my next procedure. Emphatically and resoundingly, please please please let me go home – like The Beach Boys song. For the record, the break in self care and trying to pull my partner out of bed (generally so I could try it out alone for a few hours to recuperate) I needed more than I realized. I fully enjoyed people focused on all of my physical needs for a little while. Pathetic, right?

Maybe so, but I’m home. I got home a week ago yesterday. Simon, my cat-son, truly gave me the what for when I got in, ignoring me at first, but unable to help his nose, which had a mind of its own, from sniffing down my belongings and then coming over to sniff me. Persuaded by sight and scent he crawled into my lap and purred and I rubbed by now-damp eyes in his soft brown fur, and said, Mommy’s home, baby, mommy’s home.

Now that’s pathetic.

6 thoughts on “Sloop John B. aka Let Me Go Home

    1. Thank you *blush* it means a great deal to me to receive your feedback. It’s not for self care alone I write, but too, for a small chance that the words can benefit another person. One key to that lock is understandability and relate-ability. 😘

    1. I’m so glad Bobbi likes to read my posts, too. Its very cathartic to write my experiences out and get through the rough stuff with the hopes that the community I’m finding here can relate and feedback upon. I’ve been working on my poetry the past few weeks, which slowed me way down on the prose front. Thank you for your encouraging words. In solidarity to beating the shit out of the monster,
      Ilene

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